Geography2018-09-24T15:12:00+00:00

Welcome to Geography

Geography

KS3

Geography at Key Stage 3

Throughout Key Stage 3, geography aims to equip students with the set of skills and interest needed to allow them to become inquisitive learners at KS4 and beyond! The range of topics studied and the priotrity to develop deep thinking in each allows pupils at King Arthur’s to tackle even the most challenging of questions. With strong links with the English department also, geography aims to further push literacy through regularly encouraging extending writing and the understanding of various command words.

Year 7

Two of the first sets of skills we aim to develop in year 7 are building student’s resilience and their ability to work with others. This is promoted in our initial ‘survival’ lessons to encourage pupils to develop these skills as much as possible. The remainder of the year sees students study topics that give them great foundation knowledge and understanding for the coming years.

  • Survival
  • Map Skills
  • Settlement
  • Coasts
  • Ecosystems

Year 8

Throughout this year we begin to expose students to more challenging ways of thinking and abstract content. This allows pupils to begin grappling with some of the key themes in geography such as sustainability and cause & effect, alongside developing the ability to evaluate effectively.

  • Restless Earth
  • Energy
  • Middle East
  • Weather and Climate
  • Migration

Year 9

As pupils get closer to their GCSEs, year 9 aims to give pupils the opportunity to deepen their geographical understanding by studying topics that cross over both human and physical geography. Pupils will be challenged with the type of command words asked of them in year 10 & 11 and taught content that aims to develop students who take a genuine interest in geography. Pupils are encouraged to enquire and find out more, which is the key to becoming a great geographer!

  • Brazil
  • China
  • Development
  • Population
  • Rivers & Flooding

GCSE Geography: Examination Board Edexcel B

Areas of Study include:

Paper One – Global Geographical Issues (37.5%):

  1. Hazardous Earth

Part 1 Overview – This section looks into why some areas of the world are hotter than others and why some areas receive more rainfall than others. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:

  • Global circulation (Hadley, Ferrel and polar Cells).
  • How the intertropical convergence zone works.
  • Natural climate theories.
  • What evidence we use to understand past climates.
  • Greenhouse and enhanced greenhouse effect.
  • Cyclone Formation.
  • An understanding of the dangers of cyclones and how they can be prepared against.

Case Studies : Bangladesh and New Orleans (Hurricane Katrina)

Part 2 Overview – This section looks into how plate tectonics work and the impact their movement can have upon the world. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:

  • How convection currents move plates.
  • Four types of plate boundary (convergent/divergent/collision/conservative).
  • How volcanoes and earthquakes are formed.
  • How to prepare and predict for volcanoes.
  • How to prepare for earthquakes (you can’t predict!).
  • The differences between primary and secondary impacts.

Case Studies: Haiti (earthquake), Sendai, Japan (earthquake) Sakurajima, Japan (volcano) Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo (volcano).

  1. Development Dynamics – This section looks into how and why countries around the world are at different stages of development. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Traditional and modern ways of measuring a country’s development.
  • A range of reasons why countries develop at different speeds.
  • Understand the Rostow and Frank’s Dependancy Model (core/periphary).
  • Globalisation and how this influences development.
  • The Clark-Fisher Model and different types of employment.

Case Studies:

 Developing Sub-Saharan country = Malawi

Emerging Country = India (includes BT, Maharashtra, Bihar, Sardar Sarovar, Biogas)

  1. Challenges of an Urbanising World – This section looks into the difficulties faced by cities in the developed, emerging and developing world. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Understand why urbanisation is happening in the developing and emerging world.
  • What megacities are and the challenges they face.
  • Why cities such as Kampala (Uganda) and New York (USA) are so attractive and places like Detroit are not.
  • The structure of developed and emerging cities (CBD, inner city, suburbs, rural-urban fringe).
  • An in-depth understanding of Mumbai and the challenges it faces.
  • Top-down and bottoms-up schemes in Mumbai.

Case Studies: Major case-study = Mumbai.

Other Case Studies = New York, Kampala, Detroit.

 

Paper Two – Uk Geographical Issues (37.5%):

Topics:

  1. Geology – This section looks into the role that different types of rocks have upon forming different landscapes across the UK. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Understanding the differences between igenoeus, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.
  • How strata, tectonic uplift and glaciation has changed landscapes across the UK.
  • Identify which areas of the UK have more/less resilient rock types.
  • How weathering has shaped a lowland (The Weald) and upland (Lake District) area.
  • How Humans have altered the landscapes of the Yorkshire Dales and East Anglia.
  1. Coasts – This section looks into how erosion, transportation and deposition are changing coastlines across the UK and how this change is leading to different groups of people becoming affected by this.To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Understand the three types of erosion and how they lead to the creation of wave-cut platforms and cracks > stacks.
  • Understand how longshore drift transports material along a coastline.
  • Understand how material depostics and forms spits (bars and tombolos).
  • Identify the differences between concordant and discordant coastlines.
  • Identify different stakeholders of the coast and how they agree/disagree.
  • Know the differences between hard and soft engineering and their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Explain how storm surges and mass movement occur and the dangers of these.

Case Studies: Christchurch (why it’s under threat and how it’s being defended). North Norfolk Coastline (How the holistic approach HARD defends this coastline).

  1. Rivers – This section looks into how erosion, transportation and deposition constantly change the shape and course of rivers. There is also focus on what human and physical factors lead to increased amounts of flooding. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Understand the four types of erosion and how these change features (particularly in the upper course of a river).
  • Identify and describe the four types of transportation and how this moves material further downstream.
  • Know how a river’s gradient and valley shape changes from the upper course to the lower course.
  • Describe the formation of a meander and an ox-bow lake.
  • Understand and explain the Bradshaw Model, a storm hydrograph and the hydrological cycle.
  • Identify and explain human and physical factors which lead to flooding.
  • Know the differences between hard and soft engineering and their strengths and weaknesses.

Case Studies: Sheffield Flooding, Somerset Flooding.

  1. UK’s Evolving Human Landscape – This section looks into how human life differs across the UK in terms of wealth, population density, quality of life etc. There is also an in depth case study looking into Bristol and how it fares socially, economically and environmentally.
  • Describe population density across the UK and give reasons for this distribution.
  • Identify and describe how the UK has tried to ‘close the gap’ between wealthy and poorer areas.
  • Understand why the North East of England (e.g. Sunderland, Redcar) have higher levels of deprivation compared to London.
  • Understand the positive and negatives of migration.
  • Explain how globalisation has had an impact on the UK (e.g. EU, Tata).
  • Know the difference between the New and Knowledge economy.
  • Understand how a rural accessible area is changing (e.g. Met Office in Exeter)
  • Understand why Cornwall is deprived and how the Eden Project has helped.

Case Studies: Bristol (includes Temple Quarter Regeneration, how Bristol has improved environmentally, Bristol’s economy, the importance of its location etc). 

Fieldwork

  1. Lyme Regis – This section looks into the fieldwork you undertook at Lyme Regis and the process of your data collection. You will also be expected to evaluate the process of someone else’s (a made-up) fieldwork. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Recap and reflect upon how you collected and analysed your data.
  • Be able to describe the tools and methodused to collect different data.
  • Know the strengths and weaknesses behind the primary and secondary data you collected.
  • Understand the aim of the fieldwork and your conclusions to this.
  1. Bath – This section looks into the fieldwork you undertook at Bath and the process of your data collection. You will also be expected to evaluate the process of someone else’s (a made-up) fieldwork. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:
  • Recap and reflect upon how you collected and analysed your data.
  • How Curitiba was used as a case-study to help us further understand your findings in Bath.
  • Be able to describe the tools and method used to collect different data.
  • Know the strengths and weaknesses behind the primary and secondary data you collected.
  • Understand the aim of the fieldwork and your conclusions to this.

Paper Three – People and Environment Issues (25%):

  1. People and the Biosphere

This section looks into why biomes are found in different locations around the world. The section also covers the importance of ecosystems (in particular the rainforest) and how humans make use of goods and services. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:

  • How global factors influence where biomes can be found.
  • How local factors can influence where biomes can be found.
  • Describe and locate a rainforest/desert/deciduous/coniferous/tundra biome.
  • Be able to read a climate graph.
  • Understand the nutrient cycle of a rainforest.
  • Identify the goods and services offered to humans from the biosphere.
  • Understand how humans are a threat to the rainforest.
  • Know the difference between Malthus and Boserup’s theories on population and resources.
  1. Forests Under Threat

This section looks into the main differences between rainforest and taiga forests. The section also looks into plant and animal adaptation and how humans/natures are affecting the world’s forests. To be successful a strong understanding of the following is needed:

  • Identify the four layers of a rainforest.
  • Know how animals and plants have adapted in rainforest/taiga forest.
  • Understand what a food web shows and the different layers to this.
  • Contrast the differences between a rainforest’s and taiga forest’s climate graph and nutrient cycle.
  • Identify the direct and indirect threats to forests.
  • Determine the impact the Canadian Tar Sands and James Bay HEP (Hydroelectric Plant) has had on the taiga biome.
  • Describe how a number of conservation groups have attempted to help forest environments.
  1. Consuming Energy Resources

This section looks into the supply and demand of energy around the world. The section also considers the advantages and disadvantages of using different energy alongside how attitudes to energy are changing:

  • Know the differences between renewable, non-renewable and recyclable energy.
  • Describe the environmental damage of opencast mining, transporting oil and HEP (hydroelectric power).
  • Understand how the UK is meeting its energy needs and where there is further potential for renewable energy in future.
  • Understand the supply and demand for energy around the world, in particular for oil.
  • Describe how energy is now being extracted in sensitive areas e.g. fracking/LNG.
  • Know how London has attempted to decrease its carbon footprint.
  • Identify the stakeholders of energy.
  • Understand why attitudes to energy are beginning to change.